Seven Of The Most Popular Gardens To Visit In Britain

Around this time of year many gardeners will be planning ahead, scouring seed catalogues and browsing gardening magazines and books – awaiting the coming spring, and the prospect of the pleasures and delights to come. Here in Britain we are fortunate in that we have many beautiful gardens to which we can turn for inspiration and ideas – our countryside, towns and villages, in all directions are brimming full with glorious gardens, of all types, examples of the very best to be found anywhere in the world.

You could spend years travelling Britain visiting wonderful gardens, and still not see all the many magnificent examples there are on offer; but one must start somewhere. The list of great gardens to visit could easily include hundreds and still not be complete; but here we will look at just seven of the best, the most popular.

Great Dixter – Sussex

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The original Northiam house, known as Great Dixter, dating from the mid-15th century was purchased in 1910 by Nathaniel Lloyd, father of Christophe Lloyd the famous gardener and author of many books on plants and planting. The garden, in the arts and crafts style features exceptional topiary, the celebrated long border, an orchard and a wild flower meadow. The house and garden are open to the public from April to the end of October.

Sissinghurst Castle – Kent

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The garden at Sissinghurst Castle in the Weald of Kent is one of the most famous gardens in England. The gardens were created by Vita Sackville-West & Harold Nicolson back in the 1930’s and are today managed by the National Trust. The garden is actually a series of ten individual gardens, each one a delight in itself. This garden is truly inspirational, and a great place to get ideas. It can get busy during peak times, but you will not be disappointed – a great day out.

RHS Garden – Wisley

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The gardens at Wisley, one of four managed by the Royal Horticultural Society, were founded by Victorian businessman and RHS member George Ferguson Wilson in 1878. Today, Wisley is known around the world, is a large and diverse garden of some 240 acres that includes formal, informal and model gardens – various glasshouses and a huge arboretum.

Castle Howard – Yorkshire

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Castle Howard, a magnificent 18th century residence situated in 1,000 acres of North Yorkshire countryside truly is a place of outstanding natural beauty. With attractions that include the “Yorkshire Arboretum”, 120 acres of glorious parkland, lakes and ponds, the gardens are further enhanced by wildflower meadows and huge numbers of spring- and early summer-flowering bulbs.

Alnwick Castle – Northumberland

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This garden favourite is actually a complex of formal gardens set within the grounds of Alnwick Castle in the town of Alnwick, Northumberland. The famous landscape designer Capability Brown designed much of these Gardens. In addition to the magnificence one would therefore expect, and are treated to: Alnwick also has the countries only poison garden, and last but not least – the Tree house garden and its unique restaurants are positively magical.

Hampton Court Palace – Surrey

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Hampton Court Palace should be at the top, or very near the top of every gardener’s must visit list. One for history buffs and gardeners alike, the beautiful gardens that run down to the River Thames, are truly magical – the entire palace and its grounds are timeless and awe inspiring. Set in over 60 acres the gardens feature sparkling fountains, glorious displays of over 200,000 flowering bulbs, a topiary, orangery, and 750 acres of tranquil royal parkland.

Chelsea Physic Garden

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The Chelsea Physic Garden was established in 1673 and is the second oldest botanical garden in Britain. Consisting of four lush green acres this garden has one of the oldest and rarest rock gardens in Europe. Originally founded as a training establishment, its grounds include a Victorian Cool

 

 

 

Published January 21st, 2015 by Jordan. Article ref 3506

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